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Arch Sex Behav. 2017 Jul;46(5):1325-1336. doi: 10.1007/s10508-016-0857-5. Epub 2016 Sep 29.

The Diversity and Prevalence of Sexual Orientation Self-Labels in a New Zealand National Sample.

Author information

1
School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand. lara.greaves@auckland.ac.nz.
2
School of Applied Psychology and Menzies Health Institute, Griffith University, Mount Gravatt, QLD, Australia.
3
School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia.
4
School of Psychology, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland, 1142, New Zealand.
5
Department of Psychology, California State University, Bakersfield, CA, USA.
6
Department of Psychology, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT, USA.
7
School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.
8
School of Psychology, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand.
9
Te Rōpū Whāriki, College of Health, Massey University, Auckland, New Zealand.
10
Ngā Pae o te Māramatanga, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
11
Department of Management and International Business, University of Auckland, Auckland, New Zealand.
12
School of Art History, Classics, and Religious Studies, Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.

Abstract

In this study, we asked participants to "describe their sexual orientation" in an open-ended measure of self-generated sexual orientation. The question was included as part of the New Zealand Attitudes and Values Study (N = 18,261) 2013/2014 wave, a national probability survey conducted shortly after the first legal same-sex marriages in New Zealand. We present a two-level classification scheme to address questions about the prevalence of, and demographic differences between, sexual orientations. At the most detailed level of the coding scheme, 49 unique categories were generated by participant responses. Of those who responded with the following, significantly more were women: bisexual (2.1 % of women, compared to 1.5 % of men), bicurious (0.7 % of women, 0.4 % of men), and asexual (0.4 % of women and less than 0.1 % of men). However, significantly fewer women than men reported being lesbian or gay (1.8 % of women, compared to 3.5 % of men). Those openly identifying as bicurious, bisexual, or lesbian/gay were significantly younger than those with a heterosexual orientation. This study shows diversity in the terms used in self-generated sexual orientations, and provides up-to-date gender, age, and prevalence estimates for the New Zealand population. Finally, results reveal that a substantial minority of participants may not have understood the question about sexual orientation.

KEYWORDS:

Asexuality; Heteronormativity; Heterosexuality; Pansexuality; Sexual identity; Sexual orientation

PMID:
27686089
DOI:
10.1007/s10508-016-0857-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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