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J Infect Dis. 2016 Dec 15;214(12):1817-1821. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Cigarette Smoking and Inflammation, Monocyte Activation, and Coagulation in HIV-Infected Individuals Receiving Antiretroviral Therapy, Compared With Uninfected Individuals.

Author information

1
Department of Global Health.
2
Amsterdam Institute for Global Health and Development.
3
Division of Infectious Diseases.
4
Center for Infection and Immunity Amsterdam.
5
HIV Monitoring Foundation.
6
Department of Experimental Immunology, Academic Medical Center.
7
Infectious Diseases Research, Public Health Service Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

Abstract

Smoking may affect cardiovascular disease risk more strongly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals than HIV-uninfected individuals. We hypothesized that an interaction at the level of the immune system may contribute to this increased risk. We assessed soluble markers of inflammation (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hsCRP]), immune activation (soluble [s]CD14 and sCD163), and coagulation (D-dimer) in HIV-infected and uninfected never, former, and current smokers. Smoking was independently associated with higher hsCRP levels and lower sCD163 levels and was borderline significantly associated with higher sCD14 and D-dimer levels. We found no evidence of a differential effect of smoking in HIV-infected individuals as compared to uninfected individuals.

KEYWORDS:

HIV infection; coagulation; inflammation; monocyte activation; smoking

PMID:
27683822
DOI:
10.1093/infdis/jiw459
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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