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Am J Clin Nutr. 2016 Nov;104(5):1403-1409. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Adherence to the Mediterranean diet is associated with better quality of life: data from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Geriatrics Division, and ilmannato@tiscali.it ilmannato@gmail.com.
2
Institute for Clinical Research and Education in Medicine, Padua, Italy.
3
Physiotherapy Department, South London and Maudsley National Health Service Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
4
Health Service and Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, London, United Kingdom.
5
Faculty of Health, Social Care and Education, Anglia Ruskin University, Chelmsford, United Kingdom.
6
Aging Branch, Neuroscience Institute, National Research Council, Padua, Italy.
7
Department of Neurosciences, University of Padua, Padua, Italy.
8
Padua Local Unit, National Health Care System, Padua, Italy.
9
Department of Pathology and Diagnostics, University and Hospital Trust of Verona, Verona, Italy; and.
10
Surgical Pathology Unit, Santa Chiara Hospital, Trento, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The Mediterranean diet has positively influenced various medical conditions, but only a paucity of studies has considered the relation between the Mediterranean diet and quality of life (QOL) among people living in North America.

OBJECTIVE:

We investigated whether a higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet (aMED) was associated with better QOL and decreased pain, stiffness, disability, and depression in a large cohort of North Americans from the Osteoarthritis Initiative.

DESIGN:

aMED was evaluated through a validated Mediterranean diet score categorized into quintiles. Outcomes of interest were QOL [assessed with the 12-Item Short-Form Health Outcome Survey (SF-12)]; disability, pain, and stiffness [assessed in both knees with the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Arthritis Index (WOMAC)]; and depressive symptoms [assessed with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D)].

RESULTS:

Of the 4470 participants (2605 women; mean age: 61.3 y), those with a higher aMED had significantly more favorable scores on all outcomes investigated (P < 0.0001 for all comparisons). After adjustment for potential confounders in linear regression analyses, a higher aMED was significantly associated with a higher SF-12 physical composite scale value (β: 0.10; 95% CI: 0.05, 0.15; P < 0.0001), lower WOMAC scores (except for stiffness), and lower CES-D scores (β: -0.05; 95% CI: -0.09, -0.01; P = 0.01). An adjusted logistic regression analysis, taking as reference those in the 2 highest quintiles of the aMED score, confirmed these findings.

CONCLUSION:

Higher aMED is associated with better QOL and decreased pain, disability, and depressive symptoms. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00080171.

KEYWORDS:

Mediterranean diet; depression; disability; pain; quality of life osteoarthritis initiative

PMID:
27680996
PMCID:
PMC5081720
DOI:
10.3945/ajcn.116.136390
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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