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Brain Inj. 2016;30(13-14):1617-1625. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Feasibility and benefits of computerized cognitive exercise to adults with chronic moderate-to-severe cognitive impairments following an acquired brain injury: A pilot study.

Author information

1
a Northeastern University , Boston , MA , USA.
2
b Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital/Harvard Medical School , Boston , MA , USA.

Abstract

PRIMARY OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this pilot study was to explore feasibility and effects of participation in a computerized cognitive fitness exercise program by a group of adults with chronic moderate-to-severe cognitive impairments following an acquired brain injury (ABI).

RESEARCH DESIGN:

This study used a mixed methods design with a convenience sample of individuals forming two groups (+/- exercise).

METHODS AND PROCEDURES:

Following neurocognitive and satisfaction with life pre-testing of 14 participants, seven were enrolled in a 5-month, 5-days a week computerized cognitive exercise program. Post-testing of all participants and semi-structured interviews of exercise group participants were completed.

MAIN OUTCOMES AND RESULTS:

It was feasible for adults with chronic moderate-to-severe cognitive impairments post-ABI to participate in a computerized cognitive exercise program with ongoing external cues to initiate exercise sessions and/or to complete them as needed. Significant exercise group improvements were made on memory and verbal fluency post-tests and life satisfaction. The majority of exercise group participants reported some degree of positive impact on cognitive abilities and some on everyday functioning from program participation.

CONCLUSIONS:

Adults with chronic moderate-to-severe cognitive impairments following an ABI may benefit from participation in computerized cognitive exercise programs. Further study is warranted.

KEYWORDS:

Acquired brain injury; chronic moderate-to-severe cognitive impairments; cognition; computerized cognitive exercise; feasibility

PMID:
27680422
DOI:
10.1080/02699052.2016.1199906
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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