Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2017 Feb;71(2):274-283. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2016.162. Epub 2016 Sep 28.

Prostate cancer risk related to foods, food groups, macronutrients and micronutrients derived from the UK Dietary Cohort Consortium food diaries.

Author information

1
School of Social and Community Medicine, University of Bristol Bristol, UK.
2
NIHR Biomedical Research Unit in Nutrition, Diet and Lifestyle, Level 3, University Hospitals Bristol Education Centre, Bristol, UK.
3
University of York and Hull York Medical School, York, UK.
4
Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Nuffield Department of Population Health, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
5
Medical Research Council Centre for Nutritional Epidemiology in Cancer Prevention and Survival, Cambridge, UK.
6
Medical Research Council Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at UCL, London, UK.
7
Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, UK.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
9
Nuffield Department of Surgical Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
10
Cambridge University and Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust, Cambridge, UK.
11
Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES:

The influence of dietary factors remains controversial for screen-detected prostate cancer and inconclusive for clinically detected disease. We aimed to examine these associations using prospectively collected food diaries.

SUBJECTS/METHODS:

A total of 1,717 prostate cancer cases in middle-aged and older UK men were pooled from four prospective cohorts with clinically detected disease (n=663), with routine data follow-up (means 6.6-13.3 years) and a case-control study with screen-detected disease (n=1054), nested in a randomised trial of prostate cancer treatments (ISCTRN 20141297). Multiple-day food diaries (records) completed by men prior to diagnosis were used to estimate intakes of 37 selected nutrients, food groups and items, including carbohydrate, fat, protein, dairy products, fish, meat, fruit and vegetables, energy, fibre, alcohol, lycopene and selenium. Cases were matched on age and diary date to at least one control within study (n=3528). Prostate cancer risk was calculated, using conditional logistic regression (adjusted for baseline covariates) and expressed as odds ratios in each quintile of intake (±95% confidence intervals). Prostate cancer risk was also investigated by localised or advanced stage and by cancer detection method.

RESULTS:

There were no strong associations between prostate cancer risk and 37 dietary factors.

CONCLUSIONS:

Prostate cancer risk, including by disease stage, was not strongly associated with dietary factors measured by food diaries in middle-aged and older UK men.

PMID:
27677361
PMCID:
PMC5215092
DOI:
10.1038/ejcn.2016.162
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Nature Publishing Group Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center