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Curr Biol. 2016 Sep 26;26(18):R832-R833. doi: 10.1016/j.cub.2016.08.015.

Gut microbiota signatures of longevity.

Author information

1
Farm Animal Genetic Resources Exploration and Innovation Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 611130, China; Department of Animal Science, Division of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 72701, USA.
2
Farm Animal Genetic Resources Exploration and Innovation Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 611130, China.
3
Farm Animal Genetic Resources Exploration and Innovation Key Laboratory of Sichuan Province, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan, 611130, China; State Key Laboratory of Genetic Resources and Evolution, Kunming Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming, Yunnan, 650223, China. Electronic address: yingli@sicau.edu.cn.
4
Department of Animal Science, Division of Agriculture, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, Arkansas, 72701, USA. Electronic address: jzhao77@uark.edu.

Abstract

An aging global population poses substantial challenges to society [1]. Centenarians are a model for healthy aging because they have reached the extreme limit of life by escaping, surviving, or delaying chronic diseases [2]. The genetics of centenarians have been extensively examined [3], but less is known about their gut microbiotas. Recently, Biagi et al.[4] characterized the gut microbiota in Italian centenarians and semi-supercentenarians. Here, we compare the gut microbiota of Chinese long-living people with younger age groups, and with the results from the Italian population [4], to identify gut-microbial signatures of healthy aging.

PMID:
27676296
DOI:
10.1016/j.cub.2016.08.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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