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J Rehabil Med. 2016 Oct 12;48(9):824-828. doi: 10.2340/16501977-2140.

Effect of cumulative repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on freezing of gait in patients with atypical Parkinsonism: A pilot study.

Author information

1
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Center for Prevention and Rehabilitation, Heart Vascular and Stroke Institute, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the potential of cumulative high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (HF-rTMS) on freezing of gait in atypical Parkinsonism.

DESIGN:

Randomized, single-blinded, crossover study with a blinded observer.

PARTICIPANTS:

Eight patients with atypical Parkinsonism.

METHODS:

All participants received HF-rTMS over the lower leg primary motor cortex (M1-LL) for 5 consecutive days. Alternative sham stimulation was also administered with a 2-week wash-out period. Freezing of Gait Questionnaire (FOG-Q), turn steps in the modified Standing Start 180° Turn Test, the Timed Up and Go (TUG) task, and the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III (UPDRS-III) were performed before, after, and one week after rTMS.

RESULTS:

All participants completed this study without any significant adverse effects. FOG-Q and turn steps revealed significant improvements over time in the rTMS compared with the sham stimulation (χ2=6.067, p=0.048 and χ2=9.083, p=0.011). In addition, the TUG task and UPDRS-III showed significant improvements over time in the rTMS compared with the sham stimulation (χ2=7.200, p=0.02 and χ2=7.000, p=0.030).

CONCLUSION:

Cumulative HF-rTMS over the M1-LL might be effective for improving freezing of gait in patients with atypical Parkinsonism. Further investigation with a large number of participants is needed to clarify the effects of HF- rTMS on freezing of gait in atypical Parkinsonism.

PMID:
27670977
DOI:
10.2340/16501977-2140
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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