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Complement Ther Med. 2016 Oct;28:44-9. doi: 10.1016/j.ctim.2016.08.003. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

"Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT): A feasibility and pilot study".

Author information

1
Colorado State University, College of Health and Human Sciences, Department of Occupational Therapy, Fort Collins, CO, United States. Electronic address: arlene.schmid@colostate.edu.
2
Clemson University, College of Health and Human Development, Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism Management, Clemson, SC, United States.
3
Colorado State University, College of Health and Human Sciences, Department of Social Work, Fort Collins, CO, United States.
4
Colorado State University, College of Health and Human Sciences, Department of Occupational Therapy, Fort Collins, CO, United States.
5
Colorado State University, College of Health and Human Sciences, Department of Human Development and Family Sciences, Fort Collins, CO, United States.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To examine the feasibility and benefits of the Merging Yoga and Occupational Therapy (MY-OT) intervention.

DESIGN:

This is the primary analysis of a non-controlled pretest-posttest pilot study to understand the feasibility and impact of MY-OT on balance, balance self-efficacy, and fall risk factor management in people with chronic stroke.

SETTING:

University research laboratory.

PARTICIPANTS:

People with chronic stroke were included in the study if they: had sustained a fall or had fear of falling, were able to stand, and hand impaired balance and were at risk for falls (≤46 on the Berg Balance Scale (BBS)).

INTERVENTIONS:

Individuals completed an 8 week intervention that included 16 sessions of both yoga and group occupational therapy (OT). Yoga included physical postures, breathing exercises, and meditation. OT focused on post-stroke fall risk factor management.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The BBS was used to assess balance, the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale (ABC) was used to measure balance self-efficacy. Five fall risk factor management scales were used.

RESULTS:

Overall, the intervention was considered feasible, as individuals were able to safely complete the intervention with little attrition and high attendance. Balance improved by 30% (p=0.002). Balance self-efficacy improved by 15% (p=0.034). Each of the five fall risk factor management scales improved, but only two significantly improved (Fall Prevention and Management Questionnaire, 29%, p=0.004 and Fall Prevention Strategy Survey, 42%, p=0.032).

CONCLUSION:

The results demonstrate that MY-OT is a potential intervention to improve multiple fall related outcomes for people with stroke. Therapists may consider these interventions for people with stroke, but additional research is warranted.

KEYWORDS:

Balance; Falls; Occupational therapy; Stroke; Yoga

PMID:
27670869
DOI:
10.1016/j.ctim.2016.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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