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EMBO J. 2016 Nov 2;35(21):2270-2284. Epub 2016 Sep 26.

Membrane fission by dynamin: what we know and what we need to know.

Author information

1
CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, Valbonne, France.
2
Department of Cell Biology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
3
Departments of Neuroscience and Cell Biology, Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Kavli Institute for Neuroscience, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
4
Department of Molecular Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.
5
Department of Crystallography, Max-Delbrück Centrum für Molekulare Medizin, Berlin, Germany.
6
Department of Cell Biology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA.
7
Biofisika Institute (CSIC, UPV/EHU) and Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of the Basque Country, Leioa, Spain.
8
IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Bilbao, Spain.
9
Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
10
Laboratory of Cell and Molecular Biology, National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, NIH, Bethesda, MD, USA.
11
Departments of Cell Biology and Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
12
Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
13
Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel.
14
LPTMS, CNRS, Univ. Paris-Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, Orsay, France.
15
Department of Life Sciences, Imperial College, London, UK.
16
MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Cambridge, UK.
17
Institute for Integrative Biology of the Cell, Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France.
18
Department of Molecular Cellular and Developmental Biology, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
19
Cell Signalling Unit, Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Sydney, Westmead, NSW, Australia.
20
Department of Biochemistry and Swiss NCCR Chemical Biology, University of Geneva, Geneva 4, Switzerland aurelien.roux@unige.ch.
21
Department of Cell Biology, UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX, USA.

Abstract

The large GTPase dynamin is the first protein shown to catalyze membrane fission. Dynamin and its related proteins are essential to many cell functions, from endocytosis to organelle division and fusion, and it plays a critical role in many physiological functions such as synaptic transmission and muscle contraction. Research of the past three decades has focused on understanding how dynamin works. In this review, we present the basis for an emerging consensus on how dynamin functions. Three properties of dynamin are strongly supported by experimental data: first, dynamin oligomerizes into a helical polymer; second, dynamin oligomer constricts in the presence of GTP; and third, dynamin catalyzes membrane fission upon GTP hydrolysis. We present the two current models for fission, essentially diverging in how GTP energy is spent. We further discuss how future research might solve the remaining open questions presently under discussion.

KEYWORDS:

GTPase; dynamin; endocytosis; membrane fission; molecular motor

PMID:
27670760
PMCID:
PMC5090216
DOI:
10.15252/embj.201694613
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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