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BMJ Open. 2016 Sep 26;6(9):e011888. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011888.

Prospective comorbidity-matched study of Parkinson's disease and risk of mortality among women.

Author information

1
Division of Public Health Sciences, Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
2
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
3
Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA Institute of Public Health, Charité-Universitätsmedizin, Berlin, Germany.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD) may have an increased risk of overall mortality compared to the general population. Women may have lower mortality rates from PD than men; however, studies among women on the effect of PD on mortality have been limited and may not have adequately controlled for confounding by comorbidities.

METHODS:

We conducted a matched cohort study among participants in the Women's Health Study. 396 incident PD cases were identified through self-report. Each PD case was matched by age to a comparator who was alive and had the same modified Charlson comorbidity score as the PD case. The PD cases and matched comparators were followed for all-cause mortality. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for age at the index date, smoking, alcohol consumption, exercise and body mass index were used to determine the association between PD and mortality.

RESULTS:

During a median of 6.2 years of follow-up, 72 women died (47 PD cases and 25 comparators). The multivariable-adjusted HR for mortality was 2.60 (95% CI 1.56 to 4.32).

CONCLUSIONS:

PD was associated with more than a twofold increased risk of all-cause mortality among women. Results are similar to those observed among men.

KEYWORDS:

EPIDEMIOLOGY; mortality

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