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Clin Nutr. 2017 Oct;36(5):1245-1249. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2016.08.015. Epub 2016 Sep 16.

Clinical and metabolic response to probiotic supplementation in patients with multiple sclerosis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran; Physiology Research Center, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.
2
Physiology Research Center, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.
3
Physiology Research Center, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. Electronic address: salami-m@kaums.ac.ir.
4
Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.
5
Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran.
6
Faculty Member of Science Department, Science Faculty, Islamic Azad University, Tehran Central branch, Tehran, Islamic Republic of Iran.
7
Department of Microbiology, Science Faculty, Islamic Azad University, Arak branch, Arak, Islamic Republic of Iran.
8
Research Center for Biochemistry and Nutrition in Metabolic Diseases, Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Kashan, Islamic Republic of Iran. Electronic address: asemi_r@yahoo.com.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

This trial was performed to evaluate the effects of probiotic intake on disability, mental health and metabolic condition in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS).

METHODS:

This randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial was conducted among 60 MS patients. Participants were randomly allocated into two groups to receive either a probiotic capsule (n = 30) or placebo containing starch (n = 30) for 12 weeks. Expanded disability status scale (EDSS) scoring and parameters of mental health were recorded at the baseline and 12 weeks after the intervention.

RESULTS:

Compared with the placebo, probiotic intake improved EDSS (-0.3 ± 0.6 vs. +0.1 ± 0.3, P = 0.001), beck depression inventory (-5.6 ± 4.9 vs. -1.1 ± 3.4, P < 0.001), general health questionnaire (-9.1 ± 6.2 vs. -2.6 ± 6.4, P < 0.001) and depression anxiety and stress scale (-16.5 ± 12.9 vs. -6.2 ± 11.0, P = 0.001). In addition, changes in high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (-1.3 ± 3.5 vs. +0.4 ± 1.4 μg/mL, P = 0.01), plasma nitric oxide metabolites (+1.0 ± 7.9 vs. -6.0 ± 8.3 μmol/L, P = 0.002) and malondialdehyde (MDA) (+0.009 ± 0.4 vs. +0.3 ± 0.5 μmol/L, P = 0.04) in the probiotic group were significantly different from the changes in these parameters in the placebo group. Additionally, the consumption of probiotic capsule significantly decreased serum insulin (-2.9 ± 3.7 vs. +1.1 ± 4.8 μIU/mL, P < 0.001), homeostasis model of assessment-estimated insulin resistance (-0.6 ± 0.8 vs.+0.2 ± 1.0, P = 0.001), Beta cell function (-12.1 ± 15.5 vs. +4.4 ± 17.5, P < 0.001) and total-/HDL-cholesterol (-0.1 ± 0.3 vs.0.1 ± 0.3, P = 0.02), and significantly increased quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (+0.01 ± 0.02 vs. -0.005 ± 0.01, P < 0.001) and HDL-cholesterol levels (2.7 ± 3.4 vs. 0.9 ± 2.9 mg/dL, P = 0.02) compared with the placebo.

CONCLUSIONS:

Our study demonstrated that the use of probiotic capsule for 12 weeks among subjects with MS had favorable effects on EDSS, parameters of mental health, inflammatory factors, markers of insulin resistance, HDL-, total-/HDL-cholesterol and MDA levels.

KEYWORDS:

Disability; Inflammation; Multiple sclerosis; Oxidative stress; Probiotic

PMID:
27669638
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2016.08.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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