Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Nat Nanotechnol. 2016 Nov;11(11):977-985. doi: 10.1038/nnano.2016.164. Epub 2016 Sep 26.

Ultrasmall nanoparticles induce ferroptosis in nutrient-deprived cancer cells and suppress tumour growth.

Author information

1
Cell Biology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, New York 10065, USA.
2
BCMB Allied Program, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10065, USA.
3
Department of Radiology, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, New York 10065, USA.
4
Department of Materials Science &Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.
5
Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Developmental Genetics, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
6
Tri-Institutional Laboratory of Comparative Pathology, The Rockefeller University, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10065, USA.
7
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, New York 10065, USA.
8
Department of Medical Physics, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, New York 10065, USA.
9
Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri 65211, USA.
10
Molecular Pharmacology Program, Sloan Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, New York 10065, USA.

Abstract

The design of cancer-targeting particles with precisely tuned physicochemical properties may enhance the delivery of therapeutics and access to pharmacological targets. However, a molecular-level understanding of the interactions driving the fate of nanomedicine in biological systems remains elusive. Here, we show that ultrasmall (<10 nm in diameter) poly(ethylene glycol)-coated silica nanoparticles, functionalized with melanoma-targeting peptides, can induce a form of programmed cell death known as ferroptosis in starved cancer cells and cancer-bearing mice. Tumour xenografts in mice intravenously injected with nanoparticles using a high-dose multiple injection scheme exhibit reduced growth or regression, in a manner that is reversed by the pharmacological inhibitor of ferroptosis, liproxstatin-1. These data demonstrate that ferroptosis can be targeted by ultrasmall silica nanoparticles and may have therapeutic potential.

PMID:
27668796
PMCID:
PMC5108575
DOI:
10.1038/nnano.2016.164
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Conflict of interest statement

Competing financial interests. The authors declare an intellectual property interest in a provisional patent 62/280,960.

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center