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Res Vet Sci. 2016 Oct;108:120-4. doi: 10.1016/j.rvsc.2016.08.010. Epub 2016 Aug 26.

Seroprevalence of respiratory viral pathogens of indigenous calves in Western Kenya.

Author information

1
Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, King's Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK; James Hutton Institute, Craigiebuckler, Aberdeen AB15 8QH, UK. Electronic address: rebecca.callaby@apha.gsi.gov.uk.
2
International Livestock Research Institute, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya.
3
The Farm Animal Practice, University of Edinburgh, Easter Bush, Edinburgh EH25 9RG, UK.
4
Paul G Allen School for Global Animal Health, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-7079, USA.
5
Department of Veterinary Tropical Diseases, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Private bag X04, Onderstepoort, South Africa.
6
School of Life Science, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.
7
International Livestock Research Institute, P.O. Box 30709, Nairobi 00100, Kenya; School of Life Science, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham NG7 2RD, UK.
8
The Roslin Institute, Easter Bush, University of Edinburgh, Roslin, Midlothian EH25 9RG, UK.
9
Division of Evolution, Ecology & Genetics, Research School of Biology, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200, Australia; Institute of Evolutionary Biology, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, Kings Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK.
10
Centre for Immunity, Infection and Evolution, University of Edinburgh, Ashworth Laboratories, King's Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh EH9 3JT, UK.

Abstract

Most studies of infectious diseases in East African cattle have concentrated on gastro-intestinal parasites and vector-borne diseases. As a result, relatively little is known about viral diseases, except for those that are clinically symptomatic or which affect international trade such as foot and mouth disease, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease. Here, we investigate the seroprevalence, distribution and relationship between the viruses involved in respiratory disease, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus (IBR), bovine parainfluenza virus Type 3 (PIV3) and bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) in East African Shorthorn Zebu calves. These viruses contribute to the bovine respiratory disease complex (BRD) which is responsible for major economic losses in cattle from intensive farming systems as a result of pneumonia. We found that calves experience similar risks of infection for IBR, PIV3, and BVDV with a seroprevalence of 20.9%, 20.1% and 19.8% respectively. We confirm that positive associations exist between IBR, PIV3 and BVDV; being seropositive for any one of these three viruses means that an individual is more likely to be seropositive for the other two viruses than expected by chance.

KEYWORDS:

Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3; Bovine respiratory disease complex; Bovine viral diarrhoea virus; Cattle; Infectious bovine rhinotracheitis; Zebu

PMID:
27663380
PMCID:
PMC5040193
DOI:
10.1016/j.rvsc.2016.08.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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