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Cell. 2016 Sep 22;167(1):111-121.e13. doi: 10.1016/j.cell.2016.09.004.

sRNA-Mediated Control of Transcription Termination in E. coli.

Author information

1
Department of Biochemistry and Cellbiology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Dr. Bohrgasse 9/5, 1030 Vienna, Austria; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
2
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
3
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA.
4
Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA.
5
Department of Biochemistry and Cellbiology, Max F. Perutz Laboratories, University of Vienna, Dr. Bohrgasse 9/5, 1030 Vienna, Austria.
6
Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10016, USA. Electronic address: evgeny.nudler@nyumc.org.

Abstract

Bacterial small RNAs (sRNAs) have been implicated in various aspects of post-transcriptional gene regulation. Here, we demonstrate that sRNAs also act at the level of transcription termination. We use the rpoS gene, which encodes a general stress sigma factor σ(S), as a model system, and show that sRNAs DsrA, ArcZ, and RprA bind the rpoS 5'UTR to suppress premature Rho-dependent transcription termination, both in vitro and in vivo. sRNA-mediated antitermination markedly stimulates transcription of rpoS during the transition to the stationary phase of growth, thereby facilitating a rapid adjustment of bacteria to global metabolic changes. Next generation RNA sequencing and bioinformatic analysis indicate that Rho functions as a global "attenuator" of transcription, acting at the 5'UTR of hundreds of bacterial genes, and that its suppression by sRNAs is a widespread mode of bacterial gene regulation.

KEYWORDS:

Rho; Transcription termination; antitermination; sRNA; sigma factor; stress response

PMID:
27662085
PMCID:
PMC5040353
DOI:
10.1016/j.cell.2016.09.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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