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J Clin Sleep Med. 2016 Dec 15;12(12):1659-1667. doi: 10.5664/jcsm.6354.

A Nationwide Cross-Sectional Survey of Sleep-Related Problems in Japanese Visually Impaired Patients: Prevalence and Association with Health-Related Quality of Life.

Author information

1
Department of Somnology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo, Japan.
2
Yoyogi Sleep Disorder Center, Tokyo, Japan.
3
Department of Life Sciences and Bio-informatics, Division of Biomedical Laboratory Sciences, Graduate School of Health Care Sciences, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, Tokyo, Japan.
4
Japan Foundation for Neuroscience and Mental Health, Tokyo, Japan.
5
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Tokyo Medical University, Japan.
6
Japan Somnology Center, Neuropsychiatric Research Institute, Tokyo, Japan.

Abstract

STUDY OBJECTIVES:

This questionnaire-based cross-sectional study was conducted (1) to estimate the prevalence of sleep-related problems, and (2) to explore factors associated with lower physical/mental quality of life (QOL), particularly addressing sleep-related problems among Japanese visually impaired people.

METHODS:

This nationwide questionnaire-based survey was administered to visually impaired individuals through the Japan Federation of the Blind. Visually impaired individuals without light perception (LP) (n = 311), those with LP (n = 287), and age-matched and gender-matched controls (n = 615) were eligible for this study. Study questionnaires elicited demographic information, and information about visual impairment status, sleep-related problems, and health-related quality of life.

RESULTS:

Visually impaired individuals with and without LP showed higher prevalence rates of irregular sleep-wake patterns and difficulty maintaining sleep than controls (34.7% and 29.4% vs. 15.8%, 60.1% and 46.7% vs. 26.8%, respectively; p < 0.001). These sleep-related problems were observed more frequently in visually impaired individuals without LP than in those with LP. Non-restorative sleep or excessive daytime sleepiness was associated with lower mental/physical QOL in visually impaired individuals with LP and in control subjects. However, visually impaired individuals without LP showed irregular sleep-wake pattern or difficulty waking up at the desired time, which was associated with lower mental/physical QOL.

CONCLUSIONS:

Sleep-related problems were observed more frequently in visually impaired individuals than in controls. Moreover, the rates of difficulties were higher among subjects without LP. Sleep-related problems, especially circadian rhythm-related ones, can be associated with lower mental/physical QOL in visually impaired individuals without LP.

KEYWORDS:

circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorder; health-related quality of life; light perception; prevalence; sleep-related problems; visual impairment

PMID:
27655465
PMCID:
PMC5155195
DOI:
10.5664/jcsm.6354
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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