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J Neurol Sci. 2016 Oct 15;369:134-138. doi: 10.1016/j.jns.2016.08.022. Epub 2016 Aug 10.

Comparison of neuropsychological profiles in patients with Alzheimer's disease and mixed dementia.

Author information

1
Center for Clinical Research, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Clinical and Counseling Psychology, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Clinical and Counseling Psychology, Korea University, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
3
Department of Psychiatry, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
4
Department of Neurology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
6
Department of Neurology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
7
Department of Neurology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
8
Department of Neurology, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon, Republic of Korea.
9
Department of Neurology, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea.
10
Pacific Behavioral Research Foundation, Carmel, CA, USA.
11
Center for Clinical Research, Samsung Biomedical Research Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Psychiatry, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: paulkim@skku.edu.

Abstract

OBJECTS:

We designed this study to extensively compare the neuropsychological profiles of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mixed dementia (MD) in a large multicenter cohort of patients. Specifically, we performed subgroup analyses to examine group differences associated with dementia severity.

METHODS:

A total of 1021 AD patients and 577 MD patients were included from the Clinical Research Center for Dementia of South Korea (CREDOS) Study. All patients underwent comprehensive neuropsychological and functional ratings, as well as complete physical and neurological examinations. To avoid floor confounds, only patients with Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scores of 0.5-2.0 were included.

RESULTS:

Overall, MD patients showed worse performance in frontal/executive function than those with AD. Stratification by dementia severity revealed a significant difference in global cognitive function scores between AD and MD patients only in the low severity groups (CDR 0.5). Also, MD patients showed worse performance in frontal/executive function domains in the CDR 0.5 groups whereas they had better performance in the memory domain in the CDR 1 groups than did AD patients. Additionally, AD patients showed better performance than MD patients with respect to activities of daily living at CDR levels 0.5 and 1. All differences had disappeared at the CDR 2 level of global dementia severity.

CONCLUSION:

This study suggests that there are significant differences in neuropsychological profiles between AD and MD patients, with the pattern of this difference varying distinctively according to dementia severity.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer's disease; Dementia severity; Mixed dementia; Neuropsychological profiles

PMID:
27653879
DOI:
10.1016/j.jns.2016.08.022
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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