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Curr Opin Endocrinol Diabetes Obes. 2016 Dec;23(6):470-475.

Ethics of medical and nonmedical oocyte cryopreservation.

Author information

1
aYale University Fertility Center, Department of Obstetrics, Gynaecology & Reproductive Sciences, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut bNYU Langone Medical Center, Division of Medical Ethics, New York, New York, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

To assess the effectiveness and ethical dimensions of oocyte cryopreservation for both medical and social indications.

RECENT FINDINGS:

As more women are postponing motherhood for a variety of reasons, including lack of partner, for completing career plans and reaching financial stability, they are resorting to oocyte cryopreservation. To make informed choices, women rely on their primary care physicians (PCPs) for initial advice, but PCPs are not always fully prepared to discuss oocyte cryopreservation. Interestingly, there are mixed feelings among obstetricians/gynecologists on whether oocyte cryopreservation should be used for elective reasons, whereas it is fully supported for medical indications.

SUMMARY:

Oocyte vitrification has become an established procedure for safeguarding future reproductive chances for medical reasons, and its use is progressively expanding. There is an urgent need in preparing future PCPs and obstetricians/gynecologists as to how to initiate discussions with their patients about elective oocyte banking consistent with fully respecting patient autonomy so as to facilitate informed decisions.

PMID:
27653001
DOI:
10.1097/MED.0000000000000292
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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