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Schizophr Res. 2017 Jan;179:8-12. doi: 10.1016/j.schres.2016.09.021. Epub 2016 Sep 17.

The spatial self in schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorder.

Author information

1
Neuroscience Graduate Program, Vanderbilt Brain Institute, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA. Electronic address: jean-paul.noel@vanderbilt.edu.
2
Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
3
Vanderbilt Kennedy Center, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Hearing and Speech, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, Vanderbilt School of Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA; Department of Psychology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, USA.

Abstract

Schizophrenia (SZ) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have been both described as disorders of the self. However, the manner in which the sense of self is impacted in these disorders is strikingly different. In the current review, we propose that SZ and ASD lay at opposite extremes of a particular component of the representation of self; namely, self-location and the construct of peripersonal space. We evaluate emerging literature suggesting that while SZ individuals possess an extremely weak or variable bodily boundary between self and other, ASD patients possess a sharper self-other boundary. Furthermore, based on recent behavioral and neural network modeling findings, we propose that multisensory training focused on either sharpening (for SZ) or making shallower (for ASD) the self-other boundary may hold promise as an interventional tool in the treatment of these disorders.

KEYWORDS:

Autism; Location; Multisensory; Peripersonal; Schizophrenia; Self

PMID:
27650196
PMCID:
PMC5219859
DOI:
10.1016/j.schres.2016.09.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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