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Nutrition. 2017 Jan;33:195-198. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2016.07.002. Epub 2016 Jul 27.

Effects of pretransplant sarcopenia and sequential changes in sarcopenic parameters after living donor liver transplantation.

Author information

1
Division of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic and Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan. Electronic address: kaido@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp.
2
Department of Metabolism and Clinical Nutrition, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan.
3
Division of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic and Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.
4
Division of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic and Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan; Department of Surgery, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt.
5
Department of Metabolism and Clinical Nutrition, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto, Japan; Department of Diabetes, Endocrinology and Nutrition, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Sarcopenia is characterized by muscle mass depletion and decrease in muscle power or physical activity. We previously reported that low skeletal muscle mass (SMM) is closely involved with posttransplant mortality in patients undergoing living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). The aim of this study was to prospectively investigate the effects of pretransplant sarcopenia on survival and examine sequential changes in sarcopenic parameters after LDLT.

METHODS:

Sarcopenia was defined by measuring SMM using a multifrequency body composition analyzer and assessing grip strength (GS) in 72 adults who underwent LDLT at Kyoto University Hospital between January 2013 and October 2015. The effects of pretransplant sarcopenia on short-term survival and sequential changes in SMM and GS were prospectively analyzed.

RESULTS:

Of 72 patients, 10 (14%) were defined as having pretransplant sarcopenia. Overall survival rates were significantly lower in patients with sarcopenia (n = 10) than those without sarcopenia (n = 62; P < 0.001). SMM worsened after LDLT and did not return to preoperative levels until 1 y after LDLT. In contrast, GS returned to preoperative levels at 6 mo after LDLT, following sharp decrease at 1 mo after LDLT.

CONCLUSIONS:

This prospective study confirmed that pretransplant sarcopenia is closely associated with short-term survival after LDLT and that GS recovers before SMM.

KEYWORDS:

Grip strength; Liver transplantation; Nutrition; Sarcopenia; Skeletal muscle mass

PMID:
27649861
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2016.07.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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