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J Mol Neurosci. 2017 Jan;61(1):79-87. doi: 10.1007/s12031-016-0840-6. Epub 2016 Sep 19.

Upregulation of Aβ42 in the Brain and Bodily Fluids of Rhesus Monkeys with Aging.

Zhao Q1,2, Lu J1,2, Yao Z1,2, Wang S1,2, Zhu L1,2, Wang J1,2, Chen B3,4.

Author information

1
Protein Misfolding Diseases Research Laboratory, School of Basic Medical Science, Capital Medical University, No. 10, Youanmenwai, Xitoutiao, Beijing, 100069, China.
2
Department of Laboratory Animal Science, School of Basic Medical Science, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100069, China.
3
Protein Misfolding Diseases Research Laboratory, School of Basic Medical Science, Capital Medical University, No. 10, Youanmenwai, Xitoutiao, Beijing, 100069, China. baianchen@ccmu.edu.cn.
4
Department of Laboratory Animal Science, School of Basic Medical Science, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100069, China. baianchen@ccmu.edu.cn.

Abstract

The cerebral accumulation of amyloid beta (Aβ) is one of the key pathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ is also found in bodily fluids such as the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma. However, the significance of Aβ accumulation in the brain and different bodily pools, as well as its correlation with aging and cerebral amyloid pathology, is not completely understood. To better understand this question, we selected the rhesus monkey, which is phylogenetically and physiologically highly similar to the human, as a model to study. We quantified the levels of the two main Aβ isoforms (Aβ42 and Aβ40) in different sections of the brain (frontal cortex, temporal cortex, and hippocampus) and bodily fluids (CSF and plasma) of rhesus monkeys at different developmental phases (young, 5-9 years of age; mature, 10-19 years of age; and old, 21-24 years of age). We found that the levels of neuronal and insoluble Aβ42 increased significantly in the brain with aging, suggesting that this specific isoform might be directly involved in aging and AD-like pathophysiology. There was no significant change in the Aβ40 level in the brain with aging. In addition, the Aβ42 level, but not the Aβ40 level, in both the CSF and plasma increased with aging. We also identified a positive correlation between Aβ42 in the CSF and plasma and Aβ42 in the brain. Taken collectively, our results indicate that there is an association between Aβ accumulation and age. These results support the increased incidence of AD with aging.

KEYWORDS:

Aging; Alzheimer’s disease; Amyloid beta peptide; Bodily fluids; Rhesus monkeys

PMID:
27647310
DOI:
10.1007/s12031-016-0840-6
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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