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J Biol Chem. 2016 Nov 11;291(46):24036-24040. Epub 2016 Sep 19.

Selenoprotein Gene Nomenclature.

Author information

1
From the Department of Medicine, Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, vgladyshev@rics.bwh.harvard.edu.
2
the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142.
3
the Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics (MBB), Division of Biochemistry, Karolinska Institutet, SE-171 77, Stockholm, Sweden.
4
the Department of Cell and Molecular Biology, John A. Burns School of Medicine, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii 96813.
5
the German Institute of Human Nutrition Potsdam-Rehbruecke, 14558 Nuthetal, Germany.
6
the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC), European Bioinformatics Institute-European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL-EBI), Hinxton CB10 1SD, United Kingdom.
7
the Department of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee 37232.
8
the Molecular Biology of Selenium Section, Mouse Cancer Genetics Program, Center for Cancer Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.
9
the Department of Evolutionary Genetics, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, 04103 Leipzig, Germany.
10
the Centre International de Recherche en Infectiologie, CIRI, INSERM U1111, and CNRS/ENS UMR5308, 69007 Lyon, France.
11
the Helmholtz Zentrum München, Institute of Developmental Genetics, 85764 Neuherberg, Germany.
12
the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Rutgers-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854.
13
the Department of Pathology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607.
14
the Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Cleveland, Ohio 44195.
15
the Pathophysiology of Striated Muscles Laboratory, Unit of Functional and Adaptive Biology (BFA), University Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, BFA, UMR CNRS 8251, 75250 Paris, France.
16
the AP-HP, Centre de Référence Maladies Neuromusculaires Paris-Est, Groupe Hospitalier Pitié-Salpêtrière, 75013 Paris, France.
17
the Universidad de la República, Facultad de Medicina, Departamento de Bioquímica, 11800 Montevideo, Uruguay.
18
the Department of Molecular Medicine, University of Padova, I-35121 Padova, Italy.
19
the Division of Cardiovascular Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.
20
the Centre for Genomic Regulation (CRG), 08003 Barcelona, Spain.
21
the Universitat Pompeu Fabra (UPF), 08002 Barcelona, Spain.
22
the Department of Medicine, Cardiovascular Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
23
the Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom.
24
the Human Nutrition Research Centre, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE1 7RU, United Kingdom.
25
the The Medical School, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne NE2 4HH, United Kingdom.
26
the Department of Biochemistry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405.
27
the Department of Human Genetics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112.
28
the Hubei Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic Chemistry & Materia Medica, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Peoples Republic of China.
29
the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 42415, South Korea.
30
the College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 02841, South Korea.
31
the Institute for Experimental Endocrinology, Charité-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, D-13353 Berlin, Germany.
32
the Architecture et Réactivité de l'ARN, Université de Strasbourg, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut de Biologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, 67084 Strasbourg, France.
33
the KSQ Therapeutics, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139.
34
the School of Biological Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742, South Korea.
35
the Department of Animal Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853.
36
the Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Marine Biotechnology and Ecology, College of Life Science, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen, 518060, Guangdong Province, Peoples Republic of China.
37
the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 75794 Paris, France.
38
From the Department of Medicine, Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
39
the Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115.
40
the Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802.
41
the Department of Nutritional Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, United Kingdom.
42
the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716.
43
the Cátedra de Inmunología, Facultad de Química, Instituto de Higiene, CP11600 Montevideo, Uruguay.
44
the Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, Bozeman, Montana 59717.
45
the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms Universität Bonn, Institut für Biochemie und Molekularbiologie, 53115 Bonn, Germany.
46
the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607.
47
the Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706.
48
the Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, Towson, Maryland 21252, and.
49
the Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, College of Agricultural Sciences, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon 97331.

Abstract

The human genome contains 25 genes coding for selenocysteine-containing proteins (selenoproteins). These proteins are involved in a variety of functions, most notably redox homeostasis. Selenoprotein enzymes with known functions are designated according to these functions: TXNRD1, TXNRD2, and TXNRD3 (thioredoxin reductases), GPX1, GPX2, GPX3, GPX4, and GPX6 (glutathione peroxidases), DIO1, DIO2, and DIO3 (iodothyronine deiodinases), MSRB1 (methionine sulfoxide reductase B1), and SEPHS2 (selenophosphate synthetase 2). Selenoproteins without known functions have traditionally been denoted by SEL or SEP symbols. However, these symbols are sometimes ambiguous and conflict with the approved nomenclature for several other genes. Therefore, there is a need to implement a rational and coherent nomenclature system for selenoprotein-encoding genes. Our solution is to use the root symbol SELENO followed by a letter. This nomenclature applies to SELENOF (selenoprotein F, the 15-kDa selenoprotein, SEP15), SELENOH (selenoprotein H, SELH, C11orf31), SELENOI (selenoprotein I, SELI, EPT1), SELENOK (selenoprotein K, SELK), SELENOM (selenoprotein M, SELM), SELENON (selenoprotein N, SEPN1, SELN), SELENOO (selenoprotein O, SELO), SELENOP (selenoprotein P, SeP, SEPP1, SELP), SELENOS (selenoprotein S, SELS, SEPS1, VIMP), SELENOT (selenoprotein T, SELT), SELENOV (selenoprotein V, SELV), and SELENOW (selenoprotein W, SELW, SEPW1). This system, approved by the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee, also resolves conflicting, missing, and ambiguous designations for selenoprotein genes and is applicable to selenoproteins across vertebrates.

KEYWORDS:

function; gene name; genomics; nomenclature; selenium; selenocysteine; selenoprotein; structure-function

PMID:
27645994
PMCID:
PMC5104929
DOI:
10.1074/jbc.M116.756155
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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