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Am J Vet Res. 1989 Jun;50(6):838-44.

Survival analysis for evaluation of corneal ulcer healing times in calves with naturally acquired infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

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1
Veterinary Medical Teaching and Research Center, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis 95616.

Abstract

A clinical trial examining the efficacy of 2 drugs for treatment of a natural epizootic of infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis was performed. The study was conducted in 103 grazing Hereford calves during the summer of 1985. The calves were prospectively and randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups at the beginning of the study on June 17, and were examined 3 times weekly thereafter until the final observation on August 6. Calves in group 1 (n = 34) were not treated and were used as controls. Calves of group 2 (n = 34) with corneal ulcers were treated with a long-acting oxytetracycline formulation (OTC group). The parenteral treatment was repeated in 72 hours. Affected calves of group 3 (n = 35) were treated topically with furazolidone spray when they developed new corneal ulcers, or when existing lesions worsened during subsequent examination periods (NFZ group). Healing times of the corneal ulcers were reported in 3 ways: the combined times for ulcers present in both eyes of a calf simultaneously (method A), independent times of each ulcer on a calf (method B), and time of the first ulcer for each calf (method C). Censored healing times were examined as left censored (ulcer present at the beginning of the study), right censored (ulcer not healed at the end of the study), or uncensored (true) healing times. The effect that the treatments had on healing times were investigated by use of notched box and whisker plots, life tables, and Cox regression models. The analysis indicated that treatment of calves with either antimicrobial reduced the healing time of corneal ulcers, compared with untreated controls.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
2764337
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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