Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Ultrasound Med Biol. 2016 Dec;42(12):2844-2851. doi: 10.1016/j.ultrasmedbio.2016.07.016. Epub 2016 Sep 14.

Ultrasonographic Changes after Indirect Revascularization Surgery in Pediatric Patients with Moyamoya Disease.

Author information

1
Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
2
Department of Medical Imaging, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.
4
Division of Clinical Psychology, Department of Occupational Therapy, College of Medicine, Chang-Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
5
Stroke Center and Department of Neurology, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Electronic address: jsjeng@ntu.edu.tw.

Abstract

The marked cerebral hypoperfusion of moyamoya disease (MMD) can be treated with encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis (EDAS), an indirect revascularization surgery. Collateral establishment after the surgery is a gradual process; thus, easy access to serial assessment is of great importance. We prospectively recruited 15 pediatric moyamoya patients who underwent EDAS surgeries on a total of 19 hemispheres. Ultrasonography of extracranial and intracranial arteries was performed pre-operatively and post-operatively at 1, 3 and 6 mo. Among the extracranial arteries, the superficial temporal artery had the most pronounced increase in flow velocity and decrease in flow resistance from 1 mo post-surgery (p < 0.01). Among the large intracranial arteries, a significant increase in peak systolic velocity was observed in the anterior cerebral artery from 3 mo post-surgery (p < 0.05). These findings indicate significant hemodynamic changes on ultrasonography in pediatric moyamoya patients after indirect revascularization surgery.

KEYWORDS:

Encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis; Indirect revascularization; Moyamoya disease; Pediatric stroke; Ultrasonography

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center