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Crit Rev Oncol Hematol. 2016 Oct;106:25-54. doi: 10.1016/j.critrevonc.2016.04.010. Epub 2016 May 7.

Malignant melanoma-The cradle of anti-neoplastic immunotherapy.

Author information

1
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Division of Hematology Oncology, United States.
2
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, United States.
3
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Department of Surgery, United States.
4
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Division of Radiation Oncology, United States.
5
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Department of Dermatology, United States.
6
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Melanoma Program, United States; Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Department of Pharmacology Penn State University, United States.
7
Penn State University, Milton S Hershey Medical Center, Division of Hematology Oncology, United States. Electronic address: jdrabick@psu.edu.

Abstract

One of the defining characteristics of the malignant phenotype is the ability to evade the host immune system. Immunotherapy as a treatment modality represents a new dawn in the way we think about the treatment of a variety of malignancies. The story of immunotherapy traces its roots to its relationship with malignant melanoma. In this article, we review the intertwined history of immunotherapy and melanoma, including the early significant history, a discussion on immune mechanisms, resistance, local and systemic immunotherapeutic modalities, and speculate on possible novel future treatment options.

KEYWORDS:

CTLA-4; History; Immunotherapy; Interferon; Interleukin-2; Melanoma; PD-1; Vaccine

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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