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Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2016 Nov;24(6):474-481. doi: 10.1002/erv.2475. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

A Lack of Clinical Effect of High-frequency rTMS to Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex on Bulimic Symptoms: A Randomised, Double-blind Trial.

Author information

1
University Department of Psychiatry and Addictology, North Hospital, CHU St-Etienne, St Etienne, France.
2
TAPE Laboratory, EA7423, Jean Monnet University, Saint Etienne, France.
3
Inserm U1061, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
4
University Department of Adult Psychiatry, CHRU Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
5
Department of Psychiatric Emergency & Acute Care, Lapeyronie Hospital, CHRU Montpellier, Montpellier, France.
6
Eating Disorders Program, Department of Psychiatry, Douglas Hospital, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
7
Inserm U1061, University of Montpellier, Montpellier, France. s-guillaume@chu-montpellier.fr.
8
Department of Psychiatric Emergency & Acute Care, Lapeyronie Hospital, CHRU Montpellier, Montpellier, France. s-guillaume@chu-montpellier.fr.

Abstract

Studies suggest that stimulation of the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) reduces food craving in bulimic patients, but evidence supporting repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a therapeutic tool is lacking. We investigated the safety and therapeutic efficacy of an adjunct high-frequency rTMS programme targeting the left DLPFC. Forty-seven women with bulimia nervosa were randomised to a real or sham stimulation group. The real group underwent 10 rTMS sessions, each consisting of 20 trains of 5 seconds with 55-second intervals between trains, at a frequency of 10 Hz. The main outcome was the number of binge episodes in the 15 days following the end of stimulation. Overall, no significant improvement in bingeing and purging symptoms was noted after the programme. rTMS was well tolerated. This suggests that 10 sessions of high-frequency rTMS to the left DLPFC provide no greater benefit than placebo. Future studies should consider methodological issues as well as alternative targets.

KEYWORDS:

bulimia nervosa; craving; eating disorders; neuromodulation

PMID:
27633286
DOI:
10.1002/erv.2475
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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