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Br J Cancer. 2016 Oct 25;115(9):1122-1130. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2016.289. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

Dairy, calcium, vitamin D and ovarian cancer risk in African-American women.

Author information

1
Population Science, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA.
2
Department of Community and Family Medicine, Duke Cancer Institute, Durham, NC 27705, USA.
3
Hollings Cancer Center and Department of Public Health Sciences, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC 29425, USA.
4
Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA.
5
Cancer Prevention and Population Sciences Program, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX 77030, USA.
6
Department of Oncology and the Karmanos Cancer Institute, Population Studies and Disparities Research Program, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI 48201, USA.
7
Division of Preventive Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL 35205, USA.
8
Epidemiology Program, Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Public Health, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
9
Departments of Public Health and Surgery, University of Tennessee-Knoxville, Knoxville, TN 37996, USA.
10
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

No previous study has evaluated the associations of dairy products, lactose, calcium and vitamin D with the risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women, who are known to have high mortality from the disease, as well as to be at risk for calcium and vitamin D deficiency.

METHODS:

We evaluated these associations among 490 ovarian cancer cases and 656 age- and site-matched controls of African-American descent recruited into the African American Cancer Epidemiology Study, a population-based case-control study in 11 geographical areas in the US. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).

RESULTS:

An increased ovarian cancer risk was observed for whole milk consumption and lactose intake (highest quartile vs lowest: OR=1.97, 95% CI: 1.25-3.10;P-trend: 0.008). Calcium intake was associated with a decreased risk of ovarian cancer (OR=0.51, 95 CI%: 0.30-0.86; P-trend: 0.009), but vitamin D intake was not. Longer sun exposure in summer months was found to predict a lower risk (OR=0.71, 95% CI: 0.51-0.99; P-trend: 0.049).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings suggest that a high-calcium, low-lactose diet, and sun exposure in summer months may reduce the risk of ovarian cancer in African-American women.

PMID:
27632371
PMCID:
PMC5117784
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2016.289
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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