Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Medicine (Baltimore). 2016 Sep;95(37):e4595. doi: 10.1097/MD.0000000000004595.

Prevalence of chronic cough and possible causes in the general population based on the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

Author information

1
aDivison of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Ilsan Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Ilsan bDepartment of Internal Medicine, National Medical Center, Seoul cDepartment of Pulmonology and Critical Care Medicine, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul dDepartment of Critical Care, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul eDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Hallym University Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang fDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Kyung Hee Medical Center, Kyung Hee University gDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul hDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Seoul St Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul iDepartment of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Kyung Hee University Hospital at Gangdong, Kyung Hee University, Seoul jDivision of Pulmonary, Department of Internal Medicine, Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul kDivision of Pulmonology, Department of Internal Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Suwon lDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Bucheon St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Bucheon mDepartment of Pulmonary and Allergy, Department of Internal Medicine, Regional Respiratory Center, Yeungnam University Hospital, Daegu nDepartment of Internal Medicine, Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea oDivision of Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care Medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Chung-Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul pDivision of Pulmonolo

Abstract

Although chronic cough is very common, its prevalence and causes have been rarely reported in the large general population including smokers. This study aimed to identify the prevalence of possible causes of chronic cough and their clinical impact.From Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) data including 119,280 adults aged over 40 years, 302 individuals with chronic cough were recruited irrespective of smoking status. Data from questionnaire, laboratory tests including spirometry, chest radiographs, and otorhinolaryngologic examination were analyzed.The prevalence of chronic cough in adults was 2.5% ± 0.2%. Current smokers occupied 47.7% ± 3.8% of study population and 46.8% ± 3.9% of the subjects showed upper airway cough syndrome (UACS). Based on spirometry, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was identified in 26.4% ± 3.5%. Asthma explained for 14.5% ± 2.8% of chronic cough. Only 4.1% ± 1.6% showed chronic laryngitis suggesting gastro-esophageal reflux-related cough. Abnormalities on chest radiography were found in 4.0% ± 1.2%. Interestingly, 50.3% ± 4.5% of study subjects had coexisting causes. In multivariate analysis, only current smoking (odds ratio [OR] 3.16, P < 0.001), UACS (OR 2.50, P < 0.001), COPD (OR 2.41, P < 0.001), asthma (OR 8.89, P < 0.001), and chest radiographic abnormalities (OR 2.74, P = 0.003) were independent risk factor for chronic cough. This pattern was not different according to smoking status excepting the prevalence of COPD.Smoking, COPD, and chest radiographic abnormalities should be considered as causes of chronic cough, along with UACS and asthma. Gastro-esophageal reflux-related cough is not prevalent in study population.

PMID:
27631208
PMCID:
PMC5402551
DOI:
10.1097/MD.0000000000004595
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wolters Kluwer Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center