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Adv Clin Exp Med. 2016 Jul-Aug;25(4):689-700. doi: 10.17219/acem/41049.

Lower Plasma Levels of Antioxidant Vitamins in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome: A Case Control Study.

Author information

1
Department of Nutrition and Epidemiology, Chair of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
2
Department of Internal Medicine and Nephrodiabetology, Chair of Internal Diseases and Cardiology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
3
Department of Military Toxicology and Radiological Protection, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
4
Department of Hygiene and Health Promotion, Chair of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
5
Faculty of Medicine, University of Rzeszów, Poland.
6
Department of Internal and Infectious Diseases, Medical University of Lodz, Poland.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Metabolic syndrome (MS) is a coexistence of metabolic risk factors affecting the development of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species, which are excessively produced in MS, participate in its pathogenesis. Vitamins A, C and E are an important part of the non-enzymatic antioxidative barrier in humans.

OBJECTIVES:

The aim of the study was to estimate plasma vitamin A, C and E levels and the intake of these vitamins from the diet in patients with MS.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

The study included 182 patients with MS, 94 men and 88 women, aged 30-65 years (mean 57.31 ± 8.28 years). The control group was comprised of 91 subjects, 56 men and 35 women, aged 41-65 years (mean 57.75 ± 5.84 years). The MS diagnosis was based on IDF criteria. The determination of the serum level of vitamin A, C and E was performed using the spectrophotometric method. The food intake was assessed by 24-h dietary recall.

RESULTS:

The mean plasma vitamin A, C and E levels were significantly lower in MS patients than in the controls (p = 0.05). No correlation was found between vitamin A, C and E intake from the diet and their plasma concentrations in MS patients. Plasma vitamin A, C and E deficiency was observed significantly more often in MS patients than in the control group (15.38% vs. 2.19%, 79.12% vs. 8.79% and 60.45% vs. 5.49%, p < 0.0001, respectively). BMI was the one factor significantly affecting the mean value of vitamin A, C and E levels in MS patients.

CONCLUSIONS:

MS patients demonstrated significantly lower plasma levels of vitamin A, C and E compared to the healthy subjects. Lower plasma levels of antioxidant vitamins with their high intake from the diet indicate antioxidant barrier impairment in MS patients.

KEYWORDS:

antioxidant vitamins; diet; metabolic syndrome; oxidative stress

PMID:
27629843
DOI:
10.17219/acem/41049
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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