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Neuropsychiatr. 2016 Sep;30(3):145-150. Epub 2016 Sep 15.

Psychiatric symptoms and disorders among Yazidi children and adolescents immediately after forced migration following ISIS attacks.

Author information

1
Pendik Training and Research Hospital, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical School of Marmara University, Fevzi Cakmak Mahallesi Mimar Sinan Caddesi No. 41, Üst Kaynarca, Pendik, Istanbul, Turkey.
2
Outpatient Clinic of Transcultural Psychiatry and Migration Induced Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria.
3
Mazhar Osman Training and Research Hospital for Psychiatry and Neurology, Zuhuratbaba Mah.Dr.Tevfik Sağlam Cad. No:25/2, 34147, Bakırköy/İstanbul, Turkey.
4
Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Gazi Yasargil Education and Research Hospital of Diyarbakir, Üçkuyu Mh, 21010, Kayapınar/Diyarbakır, Turkey.
5
Outpatient Clinic of Transcultural Psychiatry and Migration Induced Disorders in Childhood and Adolescence, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090, Vienna, Austria. tuerkan.akkaya-kalayci@meduniwien.ac.at.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The aim of the present study was to evaluate psychiatric problems and disorders among Yazidi Kurd refugee children and adolescents, who were assessed immediately after their forced migration following life-threatening attacks by ISIS terrorists.

METHODS:

We retrospectively analyzed the psychiatric assessments of 38 Yazidi children and adolescents (age 2-18, mean 12 years, m:f = 16:22), which were performed upon their arrival at the refugee camp.

RESULTS:

All children and adolescents exhibited psychiatric problems and disorders, 50 % had one, and 50 % had more than one. The most relevant problems were disturbed sleeping (71 % of children), followed by depression (36.8 %), conversion disorders (28.9 %), adjustment (21.8 %), acute (18.4 %) and posttraumatic stress (PTSD, 10.5 %) disorders, and non-organic enuresis (18.4 %).

CONCLUSION:

Our study confirms the results of previous studies, asserting that refugee children and adolescents do not just suffer from PTSD but from various other problems that are already present in the first days of resettlement. Children and adolescents living in refugee camps urgently need psychosocial support.

KEYWORDS:

Children and adolescents; Mental health; Psychiatric symptoms and disorders; Refugees; Yazidis

PMID:
27628299
PMCID:
PMC5063909
DOI:
10.1007/s40211-016-0195-9
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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