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PLoS One. 2016 Sep 14;11(9):e0162890. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0162890. eCollection 2016.

Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 but Not Insulin Predicts Cognitive Decline in Huntington's Disease.

Author information

1
Université Paris Est, Faculté de médecine, Créteil, France.
2
Inserm, U955, Equipe 01, Neuropsychologie interventionnelle, Créteil, France.
3
Ecole Normale Supérieure, Département d'études Cognitives, Paris, France.
4
AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor- A. Chenevier, Centre de référence maladie de Huntington, Neurologie cognitive, Créteil, France.
5
AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor- A. Chenevier, Unité de recherche clinique, Créteil, France.
6
Hôpital de la Timone, Service de Neurologie et pathologie du mouvement, Marseille, France.
7
CHU of Amiens, Departement of Neurology, Amiens, France.
8
CHU of Angers, Centre de référence des maladies neurogénétiques, service de neurologie, Angers, France.
9
AP-HP-GHU NORD, Hôpital Avicenne, Etablissement Français du sang, Bobigny, France.
10
AP-HP, Hôpital H. Mondor- A. Chenevier, Département de Biochimie-Pharmaco-Toxicologie, Créteil, France.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Huntington's disease (HD) is one of several neurodegenerative disorders that have been associated with metabolic alterations. Changes in Insulin Growth Factor 1 (IGF-1) and/or insulin input to the brain may underlie or contribute to the progress of neurodegenerative processes. Here, we investigated the association over time between changes in plasma levels of IGF-1 and insulin and the cognitive decline in HD patients.

METHODS:

We conducted a multicentric cohort study in 156 patients with genetically documented HD aged from 22 to 80 years. Among them, 146 patients were assessed at least twice with a follow-up of 3.5 ± 1.8 years. We assessed their cognitive decline using the Unified Huntington's Disease Rating Scale, and their IGF-1 and insulin plasmatic levels, at baseline and once a year during the follow-up. Associations were evaluated using a mixed-effect linear model.

RESULTS:

In the cross-sectional analysis at baseline, higher levels of IGF-1 and insulin were associated with lower cognitive scores and thus with a higher degree of cognitive impairment. In the longitudinal analysis, the decrease of all cognitive scores, except the Stroop interference, was associated with the IGF-1 level over time but not of insulin.

CONCLUSIONS:

IGF-1 levels, unlike insulin, predict the decline of cognitive function in HD.

PMID:
27627435
PMCID:
PMC5023180
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0162890
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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