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Cell Rep. 2016 Sep 13;16(11):3062-3074. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.029.

An Integrative Analysis of the InR/PI3K/Akt Network Identifies the Dynamic Response to Insulin Signaling.

Author information

1
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
2
Department of Computer Science, Volen Center for Complex Systems, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA 02454, USA.
3
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Drosophila RNAi Screening Center, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
4
Drosophila RNAi Screening Center, Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Bioinformatics Program, Northeastern University, 360 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA 02115, USA.
5
Division of Signal Transduction, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02175, USA.
6
Department of Genetics, Harvard Medical School, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 77 Avenue Louis Pasteur, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Electronic address: perrimon@receptor.med.harvard.edu.

Abstract

Insulin regulates an essential conserved signaling pathway affecting growth, proliferation, and metabolism. To expand our understanding of the insulin pathway, we combine biochemical, genetic, and computational approaches to build a comprehensive Drosophila InR/PI3K/Akt network. First, we map the dynamic protein-protein interaction network surrounding the insulin core pathway using bait-prey interactions connecting 566 proteins. Combining RNAi screening and phospho-specific antibodies, we find that 47% of interacting proteins affect pathway activity, and, using quantitative phosphoproteomics, we demonstrate that ∼10% of interacting proteins are regulated by insulin stimulation at the level of phosphorylation. Next, we integrate these orthogonal datasets to characterize the structure and dynamics of the insulin network at the level of protein complexes and validate our method by identifying regulatory roles for the Protein Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) and Reptin-Pontin chromatin-remodeling complexes as negative and positive regulators of ribosome biogenesis, respectively. Altogether, our study represents a comprehensive resource for the study of the evolutionary conserved insulin network.

PMID:
27626673
PMCID:
PMC5033061
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.029
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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