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Cell Rep. 2016 Sep 13;16(11):2864-2874. doi: 10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.055.

Oscillatory Dynamics in the Frontoparietal Attention Network during Sustained Attention in the Ferret.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Neurobiology Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Neurobiology Curriculum, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Cell Biology and Physiology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Neuroscience Center, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA; Department of Neurology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA. Electronic address: flavio_frohlich@med.unc.edu.

Abstract

Sustained attention requires the coordination of neural activity across multiple cortical areas in the frontoparietal network, in particular the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC). Previous work has demonstrated that activity in these brain regions is coordinated by neuronal oscillations of the local field potential (LFP). However, the underlying coordination of activity in terms of organization of single unit (SU) spiking activity has remained poorly understood, particularly in the freely moving animal. We found that long-range functional connectivity between anatomically connected PFC and PPC was mediated by oscillations in the theta frequency band. SU activity in PFC was phase locked to theta oscillations in PPC, and spiking activity in PFC and PPC was locked to local high-gamma activity. Together, our results support a model in which frequency-specific synchronization mediates functional connectivity between and within PFC and PPC of the frontoparietal attention network in the freely moving animal.

PMID:
27626658
PMCID:
PMC5024719
DOI:
10.1016/j.celrep.2016.08.055
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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