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Abdom Radiol (NY). 2017 Feb;42(2):631-644. doi: 10.1007/s00261-016-0894-5.

An overview of PET/MR, focused on clinical applications.

Author information

1
Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 49 13th St, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA. onofriocatalano@yahoo.it.
2
Abdominal Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA, 02114, USA. onofriocatalano@yahoo.it.
3
Department of Radiology, Abdominal Imaging, University of Michigan Health System, 1550E Medical Center Dr, SPC5030, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
4
Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 49 13th St, Charlestown, MA, 02129, USA.
5
Institute of Precision Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
6
Abdominal Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
7
Martinos Center for Pediatric Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit St, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
8
Institute of Nuclear Medicine, University College Hospital, 235 Euston Rd, Fitzrovia, London, NW1 2BU, UK.
9
University of Naples "Parthenope", Via Medina 40, 80133, Naples, Italy.
10
Medicina Nucleare, Fondazione SDN, Via Gianturco 113, Naples, 80113, Italy.

Abstract

Hybrid PET/MR scanners are innovative imaging devices that simultaneously or sequentially acquire and fuse anatomical and functional data from magnetic resonance (MR) with metabolic information from positron emission tomography (PET) (Delso et al. in J Nucl Med 52:1914-1922, 2011; Zaidi et al. in Phys Med Biol 56:3091-3106, 2011). Hybrid PET/MR scanners have the potential to greatly impact not only on medical research but also, and more importantly, on patient management. Although their clinical applications are still under investigation, the increased worldwide availability of PET/MR scanners, and the growing published literature are important determinants in their rising utilization for primarily clinical applications. In this manuscript, we provide a summary of the physical features of PET/MR, including its limitations, which are most relevant to clinical PET/MR implementation and to interpretation. Thereafter, we discuss the most important current and emergent clinical applications of such hybrid technology in the abdomen and pelvis, both in the field of oncologic and non-oncologic imaging, and we provide, when possible, a comparison with clinically consolidated imaging techniques, like for example PET/CT.

KEYWORDS:

Attenuation correction; MR/PET; Oncologic imaging; PET/MR

PMID:
27624499
DOI:
10.1007/s00261-016-0894-5
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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