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Trends Neurosci. 2016 Oct;39(10):644-648. doi: 10.1016/j.tins.2016.08.003. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

Intergenerational Neuroimaging of Human Brain Circuitry.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
2
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
3
Department of Psychology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA; Neurosciences Program, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, USA.
4
Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Weill Institute for Neurosciences, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA. Electronic address: fumiko.hoeft@ucsf.edu.

Abstract

Neuroscientists are increasingly using advanced neuroimaging methods to elucidate the intergenerational transmission of human brain circuitry. This new line of work promises to shed light on the ontogeny of complex behavioral traits, including psychiatric disorders, and possible mechanisms of transmission. Here we highlight recent intergenerational neuroimaging studies and provide recommendations for future work.

KEYWORDS:

cross-fostering; imaging genetics; intergenerational transmission; mega-analysis; neuroimaging

PMID:
27623194
PMCID:
PMC5067069
DOI:
10.1016/j.tins.2016.08.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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