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Maturitas. 2016 Oct;92:176-185. doi: 10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.07.021. Epub 2016 Aug 4.

The InterLACE study: Design, data harmonization and characteristics across 20 studies on women's health.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia. Electronic address: g.mishra@uq.edu.au.
2
School of Public Health, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia.
3
Department of Social Sciences and Health Policy, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Medical Center Blvd, Winston-Salem, NC, USA.
4
Department of Medicine, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA, USA.
5
Department of Public Health Sciences, University of California Davis, Davis, CA, USA.
6
Department of Anthropology, University of Hawaii, Hilo, HI, USA.
7
Department of Anthropology, UMass Amherst, Amherst, MA, USA.
8
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, London, UK.
9
Nutritional Epidemiology Group, School of Food Science and Nutrition, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK.
10
Cancer Epidemiology Center, Cancer Council Victoria, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia.
11
Institute of Education, Center for Longitudinal Studies, University of London, London, UK.
12
School of Health Sciences, Gunma University, Maebashi City, Gunma Prefecture, Japan.
13
Department of Health Promotion Science, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan.
14
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hirosaki University School of Medicine, Hirosaki, Japan.
15
Medical Research Council Unit for Lifelong Health and Ageing at UCL, London, UK.
16
Center for Research on Population and Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, American University of Beirut, Lebanon.
17
School of Nursing, University of California, San Francisco, CA, USA.
18
Finsencenter, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagan, Denmark.
19
Department of Women's Health Nursing Tohoku University Graduate School of Medicine, Sendai Japan.
20
Biobehavioral Nursing and Health Systems, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
21
Family and Child Nursing, School of Nursing, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA.
22
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
23
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Epidemiology, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA.
24
Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; Samfundet Folkhälsan, Helsinki, Finland; Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; Department of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, Norway.
25
Menzies Health Institute Queensland, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

The International Collaboration for a Life Course Approach to Reproductive Health and Chronic Disease Events (InterLACE) project is a global research collaboration that aims to advance understanding of women's reproductive health in relation to chronic disease risk by pooling individual participant data from several cohort and cross-sectional studies. The aim of this paper is to describe the characteristics of contributing studies and to present the distribution of demographic and reproductive factors and chronic disease outcomes in InterLACE.

STUDY DESIGN:

InterLACE is an individual-level pooled study of 20 observational studies (12 of which are longitudinal) from ten countries. Variables were harmonized across studies to create a new and systematic synthesis of life-course data.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Harmonized data were derived in three domains: 1) socio-demographic and lifestyle factors, 2) female reproductive characteristics, and 3) chronic disease outcomes (cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes).

RESULTS:

InterLACE pooled data from 229,054 mid-aged women. Overall, 76% of the women were Caucasian and 22% Japanese; other ethnicities (of 300 or more participants) included Hispanic/Latin American (0.2%), Chinese (0.2%), Middle Eastern (0.3%), African/black (0.5%), and Other (1.0%). The median age at baseline was 47 years (Inter-quartile range (IQR): 41-53), and that at the last follow-up was 56 years (IQR: 48-64). Regarding reproductive characteristics, half of the women (49.8%) had their first menstruation (menarche) at 12-13 years of age. The distribution of menopausal status and the prevalence of chronic disease varied considerably among studies. At baseline, most women (57%) were pre- or peri-menopausal, 20% reported a natural menopause (range 0.8-55.6%) and the remainder had surgery or were taking hormones. By the end of follow-up, the prevalence rates of CVD and diabetes were 7.2% (range 0.9-24.6%) and 5.1% (range 1.3-13.2%), respectively.

CONCLUSIONS:

The scale and heterogeneity of InterLACE data provide an opportunity to strengthen evidence concerning the relationships between reproductive health through life and subsequent risks of chronic disease, including cross-cultural comparisons.

KEYWORDS:

Baseline characteristics; Chronic disease; Cross-cultural comparison; Harmonization; Life-course research; Reproductive health

PMID:
27621257
PMCID:
PMC5378383
DOI:
10.1016/j.maturitas.2016.07.021
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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