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J Surg Res. 2016 Sep;205(1):19-27. doi: 10.1016/j.jss.2016.05.036. Epub 2016 May 26.

Patterns and outcomes of colorectal cancer in adolescents and young adults.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Mount Sinai St-Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital Center, New York, New York.
2
Department of Surgical Oncology, The John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence St. John's Health Center, Santa Monica, California.
3
Department of Surgery, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California.
4
Department of Surgical Oncology, The John Wayne Cancer Institute at Providence St. John's Health Center, Santa Monica, California. Electronic address: Goldfarbm@jwci.org.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The incidence of colorectal cancer (CRC) in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population (aged 15-39 y) is rising.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

We used the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Database to study CRC in the AYA population. We studied clinical and socioeconomic factors associated with survival.

RESULTS:

Of the 11,071 cases of CRC, the most common site of the primary tumor was the rectum (25%), whereas 66.6% of the diseases were left sided. Most of the patients (72%) presented with regional or metastatic disease. However, the disease-specific survival (DSS) and the overall survival of the AYA population were comparable to those of the general population (DSS; 5- and 10-y: 64.8%, 57.3%; overall survival; 5- and 10-y: 61.5% and 52.4%). On multivariate analysis, disease stage at the time of the diagnosis was the strongest predictor of mortality. After controlling for disease stage, male gender, black race, and higher grade tumors were associated with worse survival.

CONCLUSIONS:

The AYA population presents with advanced distal CRC but have similar survival compared with the general population.

KEYWORDS:

AYA; Adolescents; Colon cancer; Rectal cancer; Young adults

PMID:
27620994
DOI:
10.1016/j.jss.2016.05.036
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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