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Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2016 Dec;125(12):992-996. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Soccer-Related Facial Trauma: A Nationwide Perspective.

Author information

1
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA mbobian@med.wayne.edu.
2
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
3
Department of Neurosurgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA.
4
Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, USA.
5
Department of Neurological Surgery, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, USA.
6
Center for Skull Base and Pituitary Surgery, Neurological Institute of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, USA.
7
Department of Opthalmology and Visual Science, Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Newark, New Jersey, USA.
8
Division of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Soccer participation continues to increase among all ages in the US. Our objective was to analyze trends in soccer-related facial injury epidemiology, demographics, and mechanisms of injury.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

The National Electronic Injury Surveillance System was evaluated for soccer-related facial injuries from 2010 through 2014. Results for product code "soccer" were filtered for injures to the face. Number of injuries was extrapolated, and data were analyzed for age, sex, specific injury diagnoses, locations, and mechanisms.

RESULTS:

In all, 2054 soccer-related facial trauma entries were analyzed. During this time, the number of injures remained relatively stable. Lacerations were the most common diagnosis (44.2%), followed by contusions and fractures. The most common sites of fracture were the nose (75.1%). Of fractures with a reported mechanism of injury, the most common was head-to-head collisions (39.0%). Patients <19 years accounted for 66.9% of injuries, and athletes over 18 years old had a higher risk of fractures.

CONCLUSIONS:

The incidence of soccer-related facial trauma has remained stable, but the severity of such injuries remain a danger. Facial protection in soccer is virtually absent, and our findings reinforce the need to educate athletes, families, and physicians on injury awareness and prevention.

KEYWORDS:

NEISS; National Electronic Injury Surveillance System; facial trauma; soccer; soccer-related injury

PMID:
27620669
DOI:
10.1177/0003489416668195
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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