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Drug Alcohol Depend. 2016 Nov 1;168:61-68. doi: 10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.08.015. Epub 2016 Aug 21.

Rapid transition from drinking to alcohol dependence among adolescent and young-adult newly incident drinkers in the United States, 2002-2013.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, 48824, USA.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Michigan State University, East Lansing, 48824, USA. Electronic address: janthony@msu.edu.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

To study male-female and age differences in estimates of rapid transition from first full drink to alcohol dependence among youthful newly incident drinkers in the United States (US).

METHOD:

The study population included 12-to-25-year-old non-institutionalized US civilian residents, sampled for US National Surveys on Drug Use and Health 2002-2013, with assessments via confidential computer assisted self-interviews. Newly incident drinkers are those who had their first full drink soon before the assessment (n=32,562 12-to-25-year- olds). Alcohol dependence (AD) criteria are from DSM-IV.

RESULTS:

For 12-to-25-year-old females, the peak risk for making a rapid transition from first full drink to alcohol dependence is seen during adolescence, followed by declining estimates (meta-analysis summary=3% at 12-17 years of age, 95% CI=2%, 3%). Among males, corresponding estimates fluctuate around 2%, with no appreciable differences across age strata. Among 12-to-17-year-old newly incident drinkers, there is a female excess in the rapid transition to alcohol dependence; a male excess is observed among young adult newly incident drinkers. Evaluated cohort-wise, using an epidemiological mutoscope view, individual cohorts show a congruent pattern, with age at first drink held constant.

CONCLUSIONS:

Studying multiple replication samples of young newly incident drinkers, we discovered a clear female excess in the risk of a rapid transition from first full drink to alcohol dependence among adolescents, with age patterns differing across males and females.

KEYWORDS:

Adolescents; Alcohol dependence; Male-female difference; United States

PMID:
27620346
PMCID:
PMC5086294
DOI:
10.1016/j.drugalcdep.2016.08.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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