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Biochim Biophys Acta. 2016 Dec;1857(12):1860-1869. doi: 10.1016/j.bbabio.2016.09.003. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

A mathematical model of non-photochemical quenching to study short-term light memory in plants.

Author information

  • 1Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, Institute for Quantitative and Theoretical Biology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf 40225, Germany.
  • 2Department of Biotechnology and Plant Breeding, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University Of Mashhad, 9177948974 Mashhad, Iran.
  • 3Plant Biochemistry and Stress Physiology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf 40225, Germany.
  • 4Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences, Institute for Quantitative and Theoretical Biology, Heinrich-Heine University, Düsseldorf 40225, Germany. Electronic address: oliver.ebenhoeh@hhu.de.

Abstract

Plants are permanently exposed to rapidly changing environments, therefore it is evident that they had to evolve mechanisms enabling them to dynamically adapt to such fluctuations. Here we study how plants can be trained to enhance their photoprotection and elaborate on the concept of the short-term illumination memory in Arabidopsis thaliana. By monitoring fluorescence emission dynamics we systematically observe the extent of non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) after previous light exposure to recognise and quantify the memory effect. We propose a simplified mathematical model of photosynthesis that includes the key components required for NPQ activation, which allows us to quantify the contribution to photoprotection by those components. Due to its reduced complexity, our model can be easily applied to study similar behavioural changes in other species, which we demonstrate by adapting it to the shadow-tolerant plant Epipremnum aureum. Our results indicate that a basic mechanism of short-term light memory is preserved. The slow component, accumulation of zeaxanthin, accounts for the amount of memory remaining after relaxation in darkness, while the fast one, antenna protonation, increases quenching efficiency. With our combined theoretical and experimental approach we provide a unifying framework describing common principles of key photoprotective mechanisms across species in general, mathematical terms.

KEYWORDS:

Light acclimation; Photosynthetic regulation; Xanthophyll cycle

PMID:
27620066
DOI:
10.1016/j.bbabio.2016.09.003
[PubMed - in process]
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