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Nat Med. 2016 Nov;22(11):1256-1259. doi: 10.1038/nm.4193. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Fetal brain lesions after subcutaneous inoculation of Zika virus in a pregnant nonhuman primate.

Author information

  • 1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 2Department of Immunology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 3Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 4Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 5Department of Pathology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 6Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 7Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 8Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 9Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 10Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 11Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 12Department of Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 13Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 14Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 15Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 16Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
  • 17Department of Radiology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 18Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
  • 19Center for Integrative Brain Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

We describe the development of fetal brain lesions after Zika virus (ZIKV) inoculation in a pregnant pigtail macaque. Periventricular lesions developed within 10 d and evolved asymmetrically in the occipital-parietal lobes. Fetal autopsy revealed ZIKV in the brain and significant cerebral white matter hypoplasia, periventricular white matter gliosis, and axonal and ependymal injury. Our observation of ZIKV-associated fetal brain lesions in a nonhuman primate provides a model for therapeutic evaluation.

PMID:
27618651
DOI:
10.1038/nm.4193
[PubMed - in process]
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