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Nat Med. 2016 Nov;22(11):1256-1259. doi: 10.1038/nm.4193. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Fetal brain lesions after subcutaneous inoculation of Zika virus in a pregnant nonhuman primate.

Author information

1
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
2
Department of Immunology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
3
Center for Innate Immunity and Immune Disease, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
4
Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
5
Department of Pathology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA.
6
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
7
Department of Bioengineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
8
Department of Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
9
Center for Global Infectious Disease Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.
10
Department of Global Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
11
Washington National Primate Research Center, Seattle, Washington, USA.
12
Department of Neurology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
13
Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
14
Department of Molecular Microbiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
15
Department of Pathology and Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
16
Center for Human Immunology and Immunotherapy Programs, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.
17
Department of Radiology, Seattle Children's Hospital, Seattle, Washington, USA.
18
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
19
Center for Integrative Brain Research, Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, Washington, USA.

Abstract

We describe the development of fetal brain lesions after Zika virus (ZIKV) inoculation in a pregnant pigtail macaque. Periventricular lesions developed within 10 d and evolved asymmetrically in the occipital-parietal lobes. Fetal autopsy revealed ZIKV in the brain and significant cerebral white matter hypoplasia, periventricular white matter gliosis, and axonal and ependymal injury. Our observation of ZIKV-associated fetal brain lesions in a nonhuman primate provides a model for therapeutic evaluation.

PMID:
27618651
PMCID:
PMC5365281
DOI:
10.1038/nm.4193
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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