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Nat Cell Biol. 2016 Oct;18(10):1054-1064. doi: 10.1038/ncb3406. Epub 2016 Sep 12.

Self-repair promotes microtubule rescue.

Author information

1
CytoMorpho Lab, Biosciences & Biotechnology Institute of Grenoble, UMR5168, CEA/INRA/CNRS/Université Grenoble-Alpes, Grenoble, France.
2
Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire de Physique, CNRS / Université Grenoble-Alpes, Saint-Martin-d'Hères, France.
3
CytoMorpho Lab, Hopital Saint Louis, Institut Universitaire d'Hematologie, UMRS1160, INSERM/Université Paris Diderot, Paris, France.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

The dynamic instability of microtubules is characterized by slow growth phases stochastically interrupted by rapid depolymerizations called catastrophes. Rescue events can arrest the depolymerization and restore microtubule elongation. However, the origin of these rescue events remains unexplained. Here we show that microtubule lattice self-repair, in structurally damaged sites, is responsible for the rescue of microtubule growth. Tubulin photo-conversion in cells revealed that free tubulin dimers can incorporate along the shafts of microtubules, especially in regions where microtubules cross each other, form bundles or become bent due to mechanical constraints. These incorporation sites appeared to act as effective rescue sites ensuring microtubule rejuvenation. By securing damaged microtubule growth, the self-repair process supports a mechanosensitive growth by specifically promoting microtubule assembly in regions where they are subjected to physical constraints.

PMID:
27617929
PMCID:
PMC5045721
DOI:
10.1038/ncb3406
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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