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J Virol Methods. 2016 Nov;237:132-137. doi: 10.1016/j.jviromet.2016.09.007. Epub 2016 Sep 8.

Single-use, electricity-free amplification device for detection of HIV-1.

Author information

1
Laboratory Branch, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA. Electronic address: czv2@cdc.gov.
2
Laboratory Branch, Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1600 Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329, USA.
3
PATH, 2201 Westlake Avenue, Suite 200, Seattle, WA 98121, USA.

Abstract

Early and accurate diagnosis of HIV is key for the reduction of transmission and initiation of patient care. The availability of a rapid nucleic acid test (NAT) for use at the point-of-care (POC) will fill a gap in HIV diagnostics, improving the diagnosis of acute infection and HIV in infants born to infected mothers. In this study, we evaluated the performance of non-instrumented nucleic acid amplification, single-use disposable (NINA-SUD) devices for the detection of HIV-1 in whole blood using reverse-transcription, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) with lyophilized reagents. The NINA-SUD heating device harnesses the heat from an exothermic chemical reaction initiated by the addition of saline to magnesium iron powder. Reproducibility was demonstrated between NINA-SUD units and comparable, if not superior, performance for detecting clinical specimens was observed as compared to the thermal cycler. The stability of the lyophilized HIV-1 RT-LAMP reagents was also demonstrated following storage at -20, 4, 25, and 30°C for up to one month. The single-use, disposable NAT minimizes hands-on time and has the potential to facilitate HIV-1 testing in resource-limited settings or at the POC.

KEYWORDS:

Diagnosis; HIV-1; Nucleic acid amplification; Point-of-care; RNA

PMID:
27616198
PMCID:
PMC5056841
DOI:
10.1016/j.jviromet.2016.09.007
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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