Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Eur J Pharmacol. 2016 Nov 15;791:331-338. doi: 10.1016/j.ejphar.2016.09.018. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

Aspirin prevents bone loss with little mechanical improvement in high-fat-fed ovariectomized rats.

Author information

1
Department of Pharmacology, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Research and Development of Natural Drugs, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, China; Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China; The CUHK-ACC Space Medicine Centre on Health Maintenance of Musculoskeletal System, Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.
2
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China; The CUHK-ACC Space Medicine Centre on Health Maintenance of Musculoskeletal System, Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.
3
Department of Rehabilitation, The Second People's Hospital of Shenzhen, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China.
4
Department of Pharmacology, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Research and Development of Natural Drugs, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, China.
5
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China.
6
Department of Stomatology, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, China.
7
Department of Pharmacology, Guangdong Key Laboratory for Research and Development of Natural Drugs, Guangdong Medical University, Zhanjiang, Guangdong, China. Electronic address: cuiliao@163.com.
8
Department of Orthopaedics and Traumatology and Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong, China; The CUHK-ACC Space Medicine Centre on Health Maintenance of Musculoskeletal System, Shenzhen Research Institute, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China. Electronic address: gangli@cuhk.edu.hk.

Abstract

Obesity and osteoporosis are often concurrently happened in the menopausal women. Obesity in menopausal women is not only related to a high risk of cardiovascular disease, but also results in a detrimental effect on bone health. This study aimed to investigate the effects of aspirin, a popular anti-thrombosis drug, on bone quantity and quality in the high-fat-fed animal model. Adult female rats were subjected to either sham operations or ovariectomized operations. The ovariectomized rats were orally administered with deionized water or standardized high fat emulsion with or without aspirin. All rats were injected with calcein before killed for the purpose of double in vivo labeling. Biochemistry, histomorphometry, micro-computed tomography analysis, mechanical test, and component analysis were performed after 12 weeks. In vitro cell culture was also performed to observe the effect of aspirin in osteogenesis. We found that high fat remarkably impaired bone formation and bone biomechanics. Aspirin treatment significantly prevented bone loss by increasing bone formation. In vitro studies also validated the enhancement of osteogenic differentiation. However, aspirin presented no significant improvement in bone mechanical properties. Component analysis shown aspirin could significantly increase the content of mineral, but had limited effect on the content of collagen. In conclusion, aspirin is beneficial for the prevention of bone loss; meanwhile, it may cause an imbalance in the components of bone which may weaken the mechanical properties. The current study provided further evidence that aspirin might not be powerful for the prevention of fracture in osteoporotic patients.

KEYWORDS:

Aspirin; Aspirin (PubChem CID: 2244); Biomechanics; Calcein (PubChem CID: 65079); Cholesterol (PubChem CID: 5997); High fat diet; Inflammation; Methyl methacrylate (PubChem CID: 6658); Osteoporosis; Ovariectomy; Propylthiouracil (PubChem CID: 657298); Sodium cholate (PubChem CID: 23668194)

PMID:
27615444
DOI:
10.1016/j.ejphar.2016.09.018
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Support Center