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Int J Eat Disord. 2017 Apr;50(4):352-358. doi: 10.1002/eat.22626. Epub 2016 Sep 9.

Assessment of sex differences in bone deficits among adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

Author information

1
Department of Pediatrics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California.
2
Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to compare sex differences in bone deficits among adolescents with anorexia nervosa (AN) and to identify other correlates of bone health.

METHOD:

Electronic medical records of all patients 9-20 years of age with a DSM-5 diagnosis of AN who were evaluated by the eating disorders program at Stanford with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) between March 1997 and February 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Whole body bone mineral content Z-scores and bone mineral density (BMD) Z-scores at multiple sites were recorded using the Bone Mineral Density in Childhood Study (BMDCS) reference data.

RESULTS:

A total of 25 males and 253 females with AN were included, with median age 15 years (interquartile range [IQR] 14-17) and median duration of illness 9 months (IQR 5-13). Using linear regression analyses, no significant sex differences in bone deficits were found at the lumbar spine, total hip, femoral neck, or whole body when controlling for age, %mBMI, and duration of illness. Lower %mBMI was significantly associated with bone deficits at all sites in adjusted models.

DISCUSSION:

This is the first study to evaluate sex differences in bone health among adolescents with AN, using novel DSM-5 criteria for AN and robust BMDCS reference data. We find no significant sex differences in bone deficits among adolescents with AN except for a higher proportion of females with femoral neck BMD Z-scores <-1. Degree of malnutrition was correlated with bone deficits at all sites. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.(Int J Eat Disord 2017; 50:352-358).

KEYWORDS:

DXA; anorexia nervosa; bone density; bone health; dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry; eating disorders; sex differences

PMID:
27611361
DOI:
10.1002/eat.22626
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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