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Bioresour Technol. 2016 Nov;220:442-447. doi: 10.1016/j.biortech.2016.08.100. Epub 2016 Aug 31.

In-situ pyrogenic production of biodiesel from swine fat.

Author information

1
Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Republic of Korea.
2
Department of Science and Environmental Studies, The Education University of Hong Kong, Tai Po, Hong Kong.
3
Environmental Energy Division, Land & Housing Institute, Daejeon 34047, Republic of Korea.
4
College of Life Sciences, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Republic of Korea.
5
Department of Environment and Energy, Sejong University, Seoul 05006, Republic of Korea. Electronic address: ekwon74@sejong.ac.kr.

Abstract

In-situ production of fatty acid methyl esters from swine fat via thermally induced pseudo-catalytic transesterification on silica was investigated in this study. Instead of methanol, dimethyl carbonate (DMC) was used as acyl acceptor to achieve environmental benefits and economic viability. Thermo-gravimetric analysis of swine fat reveals that swine fat contains 19.57wt.% of water and impurities. Moreover, the fatty acid profiles obtained under various conditions (extracted swine oil+methanol+NaOH, extracted swine oil+DMC+pseudo-catalytic, and swine fat+DMC+pseudo-catalytic) were compared. These profiles were identical, showing that the introduced in-situ transesterification is technically feasible. This also suggests that in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification has a high tolerance against impurities. This study also shows that FAME yield via in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification of swine fat reached up to 97.2% at 380°C. Therefore, in-situ pseudo-catalytic transesterification can be applicable to biodiesel production of other oil-bearing biomass feedstocks.

KEYWORDS:

Biodiesel; Dimethyl carbonate; In-situ transesterification; Porous material; Swine fat

PMID:
27611027
DOI:
10.1016/j.biortech.2016.08.100
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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