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BMJ Open. 2016 Sep 8;6(9):e011963. doi: 10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011963.

Self-reported knowledge on diabetes and its related factors among Chinese college students: a cross-sectional study.

Author information

1
Department of Chronic non-communicable disease prevention and control, Baoan Chronic Diseases Prevent and Cure Hospital, Shenzhen, China Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China.
2
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Guangdong Pharmaceutical University, Guangzhou, China.
3
Department of Chronic non-communicable disease prevention and control, Baoan Chronic Diseases Prevent and Cure Hospital, Shenzhen, China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

An increasing trend in the prevalence of type 2 diabetes has been observed among youths; however, little is known about how informed young people are of its existence and dangers. This study is to assess the level of knowledge on type 2 diabetes among Chinese college students and to explore related factors influencing the knowledge.

SETTING:

A cross-sectional survey was conducted among college students in Guangzhou, China, from September to November 2013.

PARTICIPANTS:

A total of 658 students were randomly recruited using a multistage sampling method and were invited to participate in the confidential interviews.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES:

Self-reported knowledge on diabetes and its main sources were measured by a self-designed questionnaire.

RESULTS:

A total of 521 students participated in this study. The mean total score of knowledge was 13.3±3.44 of 22. Less than 50% of participants could correctly answer the questions about the onset of type 2 diabetes, the adverse effects of sedentary lifestyles, the complications, the therapeutic methods and the monitoring index of diabetes. The factors associated with higher levels of knowledge about type 2 diabetes in stepwise regression models were: being in a high grade, having a better academic performance, having a medical specialty and having relatives or friends with diabetes. Newspapers and books (61.4%), television and the Internet (46.3%) were the major sources of knowledge about type 2 diabetes, and more than half of the participants (55.9%) considered that medical staff was the most reliable source.

CONCLUSIONS:

The college students had limited knowledge about type 2 diabetes. Public education, especially among individuals with non-medical specialties, a low-level grade, poor academic performance or no relatives and friends with diabetes, would be extremely beneficial.

KEYWORDS:

EPIDEMIOLOGY; PREVENTIVE MEDICINE; PUBLIC HEALTH

PMID:
27609848
PMCID:
PMC5020855
DOI:
10.1136/bmjopen-2016-011963
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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