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J Am Coll Cardiol. 2016 Sep 13;68(11):1233-1246. doi: 10.1016/j.jacc.2016.05.089.

Left Main Coronary Artery Disease: Secular Trends in Patient Characteristics, Treatments, and Outcomes.

Author information

1
Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
2
Division of Biostatistics, Center for Medical Research and Information, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea.
3
Department of Cardiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea. Electronic address: dwpark@amc.seoul.kr.

Abstract

Left main coronary artery (LMCA) disease is the highest-risk lesion subset of ischemic heart disease, and has traditionally been an indication for coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Recent evidence suggests comparable clinical outcomes between percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and CABG for LMCA disease, with similar rates of mortality and serious composite outcomes, a higher rate of stroke with CABG, and a higher rate of repeat revascularization with PCI. These results have been translated to the current guideline recommendation that PCI is a reasonable alternative to CABG in patients with low to intermediate anatomic complexity. However, how the characteristics, treatment, and clinical outcomes of patients with unprotected LMCA disease have evolved over time has not yet been fully evaluated. We therefore described secular trends in the characteristics and long-term outcomes of unprotected LMCA disease using "real-world" clinical experience from the IRIS-MAIN (Interventional Research Incorporation Society-Left MAIN Revascularization) registry together with a broad review of this topic.

KEYWORDS:

clinical decision making; coronary artery bypass; coronary disease; percutaneous coronary intervention; revascularization; stents

PMID:
27609687
DOI:
10.1016/j.jacc.2016.05.089
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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