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Neurogenesis (Austin). 2016 May 9;3(1):e1187321. doi: 10.1080/23262133.2016.1187321. eCollection 2016.

Maintenance of neural stem cell regional identity in culture.

Author information

1
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Biomedical Sciences Program, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Medical Scientist Training Program, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA.
2
Department of Anatomy, Premedical and Forensic School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China; Department of Forensic Toxicological Analysis, Premedical and Forensic School, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
3
Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regeneration Medicine and Stem Cell Research, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, USA; San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, CA, USA.

Abstract

Neural stem cells (NSCs) are distributed throughout the ventricular-subventricular zone (V-SVZ) in the adult mouse brain. NSCs located in spatially distinct regions of the V-SVZ generate different types of olfactory bulb (OB) neurons, and the regional expression of specific transcription factors correlates with these differences in NSC developmental potential. In a recent article, we show that Nkx2.1-expressing embryonic precursors give rise to NKX2.1+ NSCs located in the ventral V-SVZ of adult mice. Here we characterize a V-SVZ monolayer culture system that retains regional gene expression and neurogenic potential of NSCs from the dorsal and ventral V-SVZ. In particular, we find that Nkx2.1-lineage V-SVZ NSCs maintain Nkx2.1 expression through serial passage and can generate new neurons in vitro. Thus, V-SVZ NSCs retain key aspects of their in vivo regional identity in culture, providing new experimental opportunities for understanding how such developmental patterns are established and maintained during development.

KEYWORDS:

Nkx2.1; Regional identity; Stem cell heterogeneity; V-SVZ; adult neurogenesis

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