Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2016 Sep 20;113(38):10643-8. doi: 10.1073/pnas.1602357113. Epub 2016 Sep 6.

Gene-expression profiling of different arms of lymphatic vasculature identifies candidates for manipulation of cell traffic.

Author information

1
MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland;
2
MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Medical Biochemistry and Genetics, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland;
3
MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland; World Premier International Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka University, 565-0871 Osaka, Japan;
4
MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland.
5
MediCity Research Laboratory, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland; Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, University of Turku, 20520 Turku, Finland sirpa.jalkanen@utu.fi.

Abstract

Afferent lymphatic vessels bring antigens and diverse populations of leukocytes to draining lymph nodes, whereas efferent lymphatics allow only lymphocytes and antigens to leave the nodes. Despite the fundamental importance of afferent vs. efferent lymphatics in immune response and cancer spread, the molecular characteristics of these different arms of the lymphatic vasculature are largely unknown. The objective of this work was to explore molecular differences behind the distinct functions of afferent and efferent lymphatic vessels, and find possible molecules mediating lymphocyte traffic. We used laser-capture microdissection and cell sorting to isolate lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) from the subcapsular sinus (SS, afferent) and lymphatic sinus (LS, efferent) for transcriptional analyses. The results reveal marked differences between afferent and efferent LECs and identify molecules on lymphatic vessels. Further characterizations of Siglec-1 (CD169) and macrophage scavenger receptor 1 (MSR1/CD204), show that they are discriminatively expressed on lymphatic endothelium of the SS but not on lymphatic vasculature of the LS. In contrast, endomucin (EMCN) is present on the LS endothelium and not on lymphatic endothelium of the SS. Moreover, both murine and human MSR1 on lymphatic endothelium of the SS bind lymphocytes and in in vivo studies MSR1 regulates entrance of lymphocytes from the SS to the lymph node parenchyma. In conclusion, this paper reports surprisingly distinct molecular profiles for afferent and efferent lymphatics and a function for MSR1. These results may open avenues to explore some of the now-identified molecules as targets to manipulate the function of lymphatic vessels.

KEYWORDS:

cell traffic; endothelium; lymphatics; lymphocytes

PMID:
27601677
PMCID:
PMC5035878
DOI:
10.1073/pnas.1602357113
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center