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Nat Med. 2016 Oct;22(10):1090-1093. doi: 10.1038/nm.4161. Epub 2016 Sep 5.

Characterization of progressive HIV-associated tuberculosis using 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose positron emission and computed tomography.

Author information

1
Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.
2
Clinical Infectious Disease Research Initiative, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
3
Radcliffe Department of Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
4
Francis Crick Institute Mill Hill Laboratory, London, UK.
5
Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
6
Department of Medical Imaging and Clinical Oncology, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
7
Department of Radiology, Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa.
8
Department of Medicine, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
9
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa.
10
Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA.
11
Tuberculosis Research Section, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland, USA.
12
Department of Pathology, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa.
13
National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, UK.

Abstract

Tuberculosis is classically divided into states of latent infection and active disease. Using combined positron emission and computed tomography in 35 asymptomatic, antiretroviral-therapy-naive, HIV-1-infected adults with latent tuberculosis, we identified ten individuals with pulmonary abnormalities suggestive of subclinical, active disease who were substantially more likely to progress to clinical disease. Our findings challenge the conventional two-state paradigm and may aid future identification of biomarkers that are predictive of progression.

Comment in

PMID:
27595321
PMCID:
PMC5055809
DOI:
10.1038/nm.4161
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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